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Sherman speaks at Harvard

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POSTED April 23, 2014 11:31 p.m.

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — Richard Sherman was called all kinds of names after his raging rant at the end of the NFC championship game. It was worth it, the Seattle cornerback said, because it gave him a chance to talk about the perception of black athletes to a wider audience.

First, at the Super Bowl.

On Wednesday, at Harvard.

“I wanted to educate the uneducated,” Sherman said in a discussion at the Harvard Business School. “I felt the need to turn the discussion on its head.”

Sherman was mostly known only by football fans before his admittedly overexcited postgame trash-talk about Michael Crabtree after the Seahawks beat the San Francisco 49ers to win the NFC title. As he became the center of attention during Super Bowl week, Sherman chose not to back down from the comments.

Injured players eager
to get to work with Colts

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Dwayne Allen spent months envisioning the day he could get back to work for the Colts on the practice field.

The starting tight end never really thought it would turn out quite this way.

When Allen was cleared to participate in Indianapolis’ offseason workouts earlier this week, he was advised by team doctors to be cautious — something that really isn’t part of Allen’s DNA.

“I feel good,” Allen said Wednesday, the first day players were available to reporters. “I was able to run around today and I’m really able to do whatever I want, so it’s up to me.”

Allen, who went down with a season-ending hip injury in September, finds himself surrounded by teammates facing similar situations.

Bills to issue store
credits to end text claim

BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — The Buffalo Bills are going to pay up for oversharing.

The team has reached a settlement with fans who say the team sent them too many texts, agreeing to issue debit cards for the Bills store worth $58 to $75 each.

Along with the $2.5 million worth of cards, the Bills will pay $562,000 in legal fees under terms of a class action settlement approved by a federal court in Florida last week.

Bills fan Jerry Wojcik of Tampa Bay, Fla., brought the case in 2012 after signing up to get Bills alerts on his cellphone. He says the Bills routinely exceeded the promised limit of five messages per week, in violation of the Telephone Consumer Protection Act.

The complaint said the extra messages were aggravating and an added cost for consumers who pay for texts and data.

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