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POSTED August 22, 2012 8:19 p.m.

POLICE: PA. WOMAN CITED NONEXISTENT TWIN IN THEFT: BIG BEAVER, Pa. (AP) — Police say a western Pennsylvania woman blamed her nonexistent twin sister for stealing items from a hotel room.

The Beaver County Times reports Wednesday that police charged 31-year-old Jennifer Brown, of Rochester, with false reports and theft.

State police say Brown took some bed clothes, an alarm clock, coffee pot, basket and a hair dryer — worth a total of $206 — from the Holiday Inn in Big Beaver on Aug. 5. Police say they found Brown in another hotel nearby and she claimed her twin sister had taken the items.

When police found no record of a sister, they say Brown claimed her sister had just returned the items, which police found in the other hotel room.

Brown doesn't have an attorney. Police say relatives confirmed she doesn't have a twin.

POLICE: FAST FOOD REACH CAUSED MASS. CAR CRASH: WESTFIELD, Mass. (AP) — State police say a Massachusetts teenager was reaching into a bag of fast food on her lap when her car collided with a trooper's cruiser over the weekend.

Authorities allege a car driven by 18-year-old Tia Grover, of Westfield, went through a flashing red light at about 12:30 a.m. Sunday just before she was struck by the cruiser driven by Trooper Daniel Moran, who had a flashing yellow light.

A state police spokesman tells The Republican (http://bit.ly/STtSb4 ) that evidence suggests Grover was eating from a McDonald's bag. Police say she told investigators that she doesn't remember how the accident occurred.

Grover has been cited for failure to yield to a traffic signal, failure to wear a seat belt, and impeded operation of a motor vehicle for having food in her lap.

INDIANA POLICE CITE DROUGHT FOR MARIJUANA FINDS: SELLERSBURG, Ind. (AP) — Police say marijuana growing operations in southern Indiana are easy to spot from the air because of the drought.

An airplane pilot guided troopers on the ground through browning forests and corn fields Tuesday to uncover grow sites in Clark, Scott and Harrison counties. The troopers cut down more than 100 marijuana plants.

Sgt. Jerry Goodin tells The Courier-Journal the resilient green marijuana plants "stick out like a sore thumb."

Trooper Mike Bennett tells The News and Tribune that marijuana can flourish in harsh conditions, pointing out, "It's not called weed for nothing."

 

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