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POSTED September 14, 2012 9:27 p.m.

DELIVERY TIMES RISE FOR IPHONE 5: NEW YORK (AP) — Delivery times climbed quickly as Apple Inc. started taking orders for the iPhone 5 on Friday, suggesting strong demand.

Apple began taking orders for the phone at 12 a.m. Pacific time. It initially promised delivery by next Friday, when the new phone also goes on sale in stores.

Four hours later, the expected delivery time had grown to two weeks, according to Topeka Capital Markets analyst Brian White.

White said the quick rise in the expected delivery time suggested much stronger demand than Apple expected. Last year, one-week delivery of the iPhone 4S was available into the afternoon of the first order day.

By the afternoon, only Sprint was still promising delivery by next Friday. Verizon Wireless said delivery would take two weeks, and AT&T said it would take "14 to 21 business days."

NEGOTIATORS HAVE 'FRAMEWORK' TO END CHICAGO STRIKE: CHICAGO (AP) — The city's nearly weeklong teachers strike appeared headed toward a resolution Friday after negotiators emerged from marathon talks to say they had achieved a "framework" that could end the walkout in time for students to return to class Monday.

Both sides were careful not to describe the deal as a final agreement and declined to release the terms. They expected to spend the weekend working out details before union delegates are asked to vote Sunday on whether to call off the strike.

Union President Karen Lewis said there were no "main sticking points right now." But she reiterated that there is also no contract yet and the strike remains in full effect. Despite the apparent progress, she said, the union is still suspicious of the board after being burned in the past.

The walkout has been a potent display of union power at a time when organized labor has been losing ground around the nation. The negotiations have been closely followed by many other unions and school districts that face the same issues about the future of urban education, particularly teacher evaluations linked to student test scores and the threat of school closures.

MARINE UNIT HEADING TO SUDAN IN WAKE OF VIOLENCE: WASHINGTON (AP) — A U.S. official says an elite Marine rapid response team is headed to Sudan in the wake of violence and protests against the embassy in Khartoum.

The deployment comes as Sudanese police opened fire on protesters trying to climb the walls of the U.S. Embassy.

The Marine unit, known as a fleet antiterrorism security team, was sent in response to Friday's violence and as a precautionary measure, as waves of attacks roiled the Muslim world over a film critical of Islam.

The official spoke on condition of anonymity because the deployment was not made public.

Similar teams were dispatched to Libya Wednesday after the fatal attack that killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans there, and to Yemen on Friday in response to violence in Sanaa.

NEIL ARMSTRONG, 1ST TO WALK ON MOON, BURIED AT SEA: WASHINGTON (AP) — The first man to walk on the moon has been buried at sea.

NASA says Neil Armstrong's cremated remains were buried in the Atlantic Ocean on Friday during a ceremony aboard the USS Philippine Sea.

Armstrong was a Navy fighter pilot before joining the space program. He died last month in Ohio at age 82. His burial follows a memorial service in Washington on Thursday.

NASA photographs show Armstrong's widow, Carol Armstrong, accepting a folded American flag during the ceremony, which NASA said included a bugler and a rifle salute.

 

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