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POSTED September 20, 2012 9:33 p.m.

SHUT UP! SPEECH JAMMER AMONG 2012 IG NOBEL WINNERS: BOSTON (AP) — For anyone who's ever been tired of listening to someone drone on and on and on, two Japanese researchers have the answer.

The SpeechJammer, a device that disrupts a person's speech by repeating his or her own voice at a delay of a few hundred milliseconds, was named Thursday as a 2012 winner of the Ig Nobel prize — an award sponsored by the Annals of Improbable Research magazine for weird and humorous scientific discoveries.

The echo effect of the device is just annoying enough to get someone to sputter and stop.

Actually, the device created by Kazutaka Kurihara and Koji Tsukada is meant to help public speakers by alerting them if they are speaking too quickly or have taken up more than their allotted time.

WASH. WOMAN CONVICTED IN SAW ATTACK ON HUSBAND: EVERETT, Wash. (AP) — A Washington state woman accused of trying to decapitate her sleeping husband with an electric saw has been convicted of attempted murder.

Snohomish County Superior Court jurors took only about three hours to decide on a verdict Thursday in the trial of Renee Bishop-McKean of Everett. They also convicted the 44-year-old of first-degree assault for hitting the man in the head with a hatchet and mallet.

Jurors were told the noise of the saw woke the woman's husband last Oct. 14 and he fought her off. He was treated for cuts and scrapes.

Bishop-McKean told police an attacker must have entered the home through an open window, found the saw and attacked her husband. A deputy prosecutor who noted the window was locked so it would only open a few inches called that the "Tinkerbell did this" defense.

OFFICIALS: FLA. MAN WANTED TO COOK RARE SEA TURTLE: TAMPA, Fla. (AP) — A rare sea turtle that a Florida fisherman wanted to cook and eat has been released back into the wild.

Officials at The Florida Aquarium say the fisherman snagged the Kemp's ridley sea turtle in May. Instead of releasing it, he put the 15-pound juvenile turtle in a tank in his backyard in Tampa.

Aquarium official Susan Coy said that the fisherman planned to cook and eat the endangered species, but a neighbor reported him to authorities.

It's not unheard of for turtle meat to be used in dishes such as soups.

Gary Morse, a spokesman for the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, says the fisherman told investigators he didn't know the turtle was endangered.

The turtle named "Lucky" was rehabilitated at the aquarium until Wednesday, when it was released.

 

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