View Mobile Site

Odd News

Text Size: Small Large Medium
POSTED January 24, 2013 9:37 p.m.

PROSTITUTION STING LURES WOMAN STRAIGHT TO POLICE: SALEM, Ore. (AP) — Authorities say a 20-year-old Portland woman drove 50 miles to reach the man she thought was her client after being solicited for prostitution through phone and text messages.

But there was something unusual about the destination: It was the Salem Police Department.

Stranger still, police say the woman walked past several uniformed officers and clearly marked signs reading "Salem Police Department" before arriving at an unmarked door, where they say she attempted to contact the man she thought was her client.

Instead, she was arrested. The phone and text messages were part of a sting operation by Salem police detectives, who first identified the woman through a website.

The Jan. 11 arrest led to charges of prostitution and promoting prostitution for Christal D. Smith of Portland.

An attorney for Smith couldn't be found Thursday afternoon.

POLICE IN COLORADO BAFFLED BY DETERGENT THEFTS:DENVER (AP) — Authorities are hoping suspects come clean following a rash of thefts of laundry detergent and expensive face lotion across Colorado.

KCNC-TV reported on Wednesday  that supermarkets are installing more surveillance cameras to combat the rising tide of thefts. They are also hiring undercover agents.

Authorities believe thieves are targeting those products because of high prices.

Police have surveillance video of a suspect in Ft. Lupton getting away with more than $8,000 of detergent from six different stores.

Detergent thefts have also been reported in other parts of the country. Tide in particular has been used as currency for drugs. Experts say it is well-suited for resale on the black market.

MINN. MAN RECEIVES CANDY 60 YEARS AFTER COMPLAINT: ST. CLOUD, Minn. (AP) — It took 60 years, but a Minnesota man finally has his free candy bars.

Seventy-four-year-old Dave Bell of St. Cloud received a package of candy last week after sending an email reminding Pearson's Candy Co. in St. Paul of the complaint he made as a teenager.

In 1952, Bell was 14 when he bit into a nut roll and discovered a twig. He tells the St. Cloud Times he sent a letter to Pearson's "to obviously get some candy."

He got a letter of apology from the son of one of the company's founders. But no candy.

Last year Bell came across the letter, so he reminded the company about the candy. The candy arrived Friday.

Bell jokes he's not sharing the candy.

 

Commenting is not available.

Commenting not available.

Please wait ...