View Mobile Site

State news briefs

Text Size: Small Large Medium
POSTED March 4, 2013 8:31 p.m.

MASS. POLICE DOG DIGGING IN SNOWBANK FIRES GUN: LAWRENCE, Mass. (AP) — Police say a dog searching for a gun in a snowbank accidentally pulled the trigger with its paw, firing the weapon.

No humans —or dogs — were hurt.

The episode started at about 2 a.m. Sunday when an officer on patrol heard three gunshots. When the officer went to investigate, he saw a vehicle speed away.

When the car pulled over, police saw a man leap out and bury something in the snow.

Ivan, a dog handled by the Essex County Sheriff's Department, was called to the scene to find whatever was buried in the snow. Police say he started digging furiously and fired the gun.

LAWMAKER SORRY FOR COMMENT ON CYCLISTS' BREATHING: OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — A Washington state lawmaker has apologized for saying that bicyclists contribute to climate change with their heavy breathing.

Republican Rep. Ed Orcutt, of Kalama, is the ranking minority member of the state's House Transportation Committee. He apologized Monday for writing in an email last week that "the act of riding a bike results in greater emissions of carbon dioxide from the rider."

He was responding to bike store owner who was upset about a proposed fee on some new bicycle purchases. Orcutt is a fiscal conservative and believes cyclists should help pay for the upkeep of roads.

Orcutt says he was trying to say that bicyclists don't have a zero carbon footprint but that it was poorly worded.

MOURNING IN NY AS BABY DIES AFTER HIT-AND-RUN: NEW YORK (AP) — A close-knit ultra-Orthodox Jewish community in Brooklyn was plunged into a new round of mourning Monday by the death of a baby who was delivered by cesarean section after his parents were killed in a grisly hit-and-run crash a day earlier.

Police hunted for the suspected driver, identified as Julio Acevedo, saying he was barreling down a residential street in a BMW at 60 mph, or twice the speed limit, early Sunday when he collided with a car hired to take the couple to the hospital.

The baby was buried near the fresh graves of his parents, Nachman and Raizy Glauber, both 21, according to Isaac Abraham, a spokesman for the Hasidic Jewish community. About a thousand community members turned out for the young couple's funeral a day earlier.

JEB BUSH: NO CITIZENSHIP PATH FOR ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS: ASHINGTON (AP) — Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush writes in a new book that the nation needs to completely overhaul its immigration policies but cautions against providing a pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants, a position that puts him at odds with some Senate reformers within his own party.

In "Immigration Wars: Forging an American Solution," Bush writes that the immigration debate holds serious consequences for the nation and members of his Republican party, calling fellow Republicans "remarkably tone-deaf when it comes to courting Hispanic voters — to the extent they court them at all." If the GOP fails to change, he says the influence of Hispanic voters "will doom" the party's future.

The son and brother of U.S. presidents writes that lawmakers should create a path to legal status for undocumented immigrants who live in the U.S. and agree to plead guilty to a crime of illegal entry. But unlike a bipartisan Senate proposal pushed by fellow Florida Republican Marco Rubio and others, Bush says tougher border security should not be a prerequisite and a pathway to legal status should not include citizenship for those who entered illegally as adults.

TO SMOKE, OR NOT? IN MINN., THAT IS THE QUESTION: MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — During a key scene in the play "Venus in Fur" the lead actress lights up a Marlboro from her purse and takes a drag, tilting her head backward while exhaling a long stream of smoke.

Vanda smokes for only about a minute before dropping the cigarette into her coffee mug, but it's a pivotal moment that begins the character's transformation into an assertive woman. And some theater employees say it wouldn't feel nearly as raw if the actress couldn't smoke an actual cigarette on stage.

Those moments of authenticity could become harder to pull off in Minnesota if lawmakers amend the state's smoking ban to eliminate an exemption for theatrical productions. Now that alternatives exist, a state senator says there's no reason actors should subject the audience to tobacco fumes or glorify smoking on stage, and she has introduced a bill that would ban the practice.

 

Commenting is not available.

Commenting not available.

Please wait ...