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POSTED July 5, 2013 10:23 p.m.

IND. TEEN FALLS FROM PARADE FLOAT, GETS RUN OVER: LEBANON, Ind. (AP) — Authorities say a teenage boy had his chest and abdomen run over when he fell from a float after a central Indiana city's Independence Day parade.

Lebanon police Lt. Brent Wheat says 14-year-old Cameron Wilson fell Thursday afternoon as the farm wagon being used as a float for Lebanon Youth Football was turning into a parking lot. He suffered severe internal injuries and was taken to Riley Hospital for Children in Indianapolis.

Wheat says the pickup truck pulling the float was driven by a 15-year-old boy with a learner's permit who was accompanied by a parent.

A 39-year-old woman and an 11-year-old boy also fell from the float, but police say their injuries were minor.

JUDGE OKS DEFAMATION RULING VS. PA. BEAUTY QUEEN: NEW YORK (AP) — A federal judge in New York has upheld an arbitrator's ruling that a Pennsylvania beauty queen must pay the Miss USA pageant $5 million for defaming Donald Trump's pageant organization.

Sheena Monnin resigned as Miss Pennsylvania last year, saying the Miss USA contest was rigged. She claimed another contestant learned the names of the top five finishers hours before the show was broadcast. Monnin said she decided to turn in her crown as soon as those same contestants were named during the show.

She posted a series of messages on Facebook and spoke publicly about her claims. Trump's Miss Universe Organization sued Monnin for defamation and an arbitrator ruled against her in December. The arbitrator said Monnin's allegations cost the pageant a $5 million fee from a potential 2013 sponsor.

Earlier this week, U.S. District Court Judge J. Paul Oetken upheld the arbitrator's decision. Monnin had sought to have it overturned based on three grounds: the arbitrator overstepped his authority, his decision disregarded law, and she didn't know the arbitration hearing was taking place. The judge disagreed.

Monnin, of Cranberry, Pa., said in a Facebook post Thursday evening that she is glad the truth is out there, regardless of the outcome.

"This is not about me being a 'sore loser' or wanting my '15 minutes of fame'" she wrote. "This is about the MUO's admission under oath that they manipulate the judges' results to suit their own ends. This is not what they advertise to the public."

MASS. BOY, 8, GETS HELP FOR DAD TRAPPED IN CAR: FITCHBURG, Mass. (AP) — An 8-year-old Massachusetts boy is being credited with helping saving his father after their car crashed through a guardrail and landed upside down on a sandbar in the middle of a river.

Authorities say Eugenio Garcia of Fitchburg was trapped in the vehicle in the Nashua River after the crash, which occurred at about 3 a.m. Thursday.

But his son, 8-year-old Joshua, wriggled out the wreckage, waded through the rushing water, scaled an embankment, then walked more than half a mile home to alert his mother, who called 911.

Garcia was rescued at about 3:30 a.m., then treated for minor injuries and released from a hospital.

Fire officials say if the car had landed in the water, both father and son likely would have died.

DA: MAN CELEBRATING BIRTHDAY STABS HOMELESS VET: DOYLESTOWN, Pa. (AP) — Authorities say a man who had been out celebrating his 21st birthday is facing charges after a homeless veteran was found stabbed dozens of times near a train station outside Philadelphia.

Bucks County District Attorney David Heckler says Dale "Bugsy" Wakefield of Doylestown was charged with attempted murder and other counts after being arrested Thursday in Baltimore.

Investigators say the victim, 71-year-old George Mohr, an Army veteran, remains in critical condition after being found with more than 70 stab wounds around 2:30 a.m. Wednesday outside the Doylestown train station.

Investigators say Wakefield called his sister and said he had stabbed someone and wanted to flee to North Dakota but was in Baltimore. He was arrested several hours later.

FEDS BAR NEW MINING CLAIMS IN SOLAR ENERGY ZONES: WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal officials have taken another step toward establishing 17 new "solar energy zones" on public lands in the West by barring new mining claims that could impede renewable energy development on the sites.

The Interior Department said Friday it has withdrawn nearly 304,000 acres of public lands in Arizona, California, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico and Utah from new mining claims.

To streamline solar development, the new zones are located near existing transmission lines, and were chosen because they had fewer environmental and cultural issues that would require years of study and mitigation.

Since 2009 the Bureau of Land Management has approved 25 solar projects in the West that when built will be able to power more than 2.4 million homes

FIREFIGHTER IDENTIFIED IN RETESTING OF WTC REMAINS: NEW YORK (AP) — Firefighter Jeffrey Walz phoned his wife and his parents on the morning of Sept. 11, 2001, telling them he was being called into action, his brother recalls. His relatives would never see him again or even have any of his remains to bury, until now.

The city medical examiner's office said Friday that it had identified some of Walz' remains, making him the 1,637th person identified among the thousands of remains found in and near the rubble of the World Trade Center after the terror attacks. Authorities have painstakingly tested and retested the material as technology became more refined.

The news loosed complex feelings for Walz's family: a resurgence of difficult memories, coupled with a new gratitude.

"We're just very relieved, in some respects, to be finally bringing him home to where he grew up and to put him to rest there," said his brother, Raymond Walz. "That's some peace."

"We kind of knew this day would come. I guess when it does come, though, it kind of sucks the wind out of your sails," he said by phone. "You have to absorb something new, and old feelings resurface."

 

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