View Mobile Site

Regulators want stricter rules for ‘Big 8’ banks

Text Size: Small Large Medium
POSTED July 8, 2013 9:41 p.m.

WASHINGTON (AP) — Regulators want to require eight of the largest U.S. banks to meet a stricter measure of health to reduce the threat they pose to the financial system.

The Federal Reserve, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. and the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency are expected to propose Tuesday that banks increase their ratio of equity to loans and other assets from 3 percent to 5 or 6 percent.

Equity includes money banks receive when they issue stock, as well as profits they have retained.

The rule would apply to eight U.S. banks that are considered so big and interconnected that each could threaten the global financial system: Goldman Sachs, Citigroup, Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo, Morgan Stanley, Bank of New York Mellon and State Street Bank.

The move follows action the Fed took last week to increase the capital large banks must hold as a cushion against risk. Other regulators are also expected to adopt that rule. It would require the banks to maintain high-quality capital equal to 4.5 percent of their loans and other assets.

The higher capital requirements were mandated by Congress in the  financial overhaul law. They also meet international standards agreed to after the financial crisis.

Commenting is not available.

Commenting not available.

Please wait ...