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Ziggy Star: He’s got game(s)

Turlocker turned passion into profession

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Ziggy Star: He’s got game(s)

Tom “Ziggy” Star shows off his collection of vintage video games at his self-named gaming shop located Golden State Boulevard in Turlock.

NANCY ANGEL/The 209


POSTED August 3, 2013 2:24 a.m.

Before Facebook and social media, there was an era where baseball card collecting engaged a multitude of passionate Americans. Just ask Turlocker Tom “Ziggy” Star.

“I was fascinated by them,” said Ziggy. “I started collecting them since I was 5 years old, and kept piling the cards up as I got older. Once I got the baseball card collection out of my system I went on to comic books.”

His curiosity with cards and comics didn’t stop there; Ziggy went on to collect hundreds of thousands of video games, and vintage game consoles, and movies.

“I always grew up playing video games,” said Ziggy. “Eventually I thought I would get it out of my system; but before I knew it, I had a couple thousand in my possession.”

A CSU Stanislaus graduate with a computer science degree, Ziggy ditched the corporate world of computers and turned his passion for video games into a profession when he decided to open up shop — “Ziggy’s,” located on 381 Golden State Blvd., in Turlock.

“I hated working in a cubicle; I just couldn’t do it,” said Ziggy. “That’s when I decided to turn my love for video games into a full-time job. It’s the biggest decision I’ve ever made because since opening this store, I feel like I’ve never worked a day in my life.”

With over 20 years in the game, Ziggy’s offers 2,000 video games, vintage consoles, VHS movies, DVD movies, and Blu-Ray movies.

“You can find anything in my store,” said Ziggy. “I have everything from the original Atari to Nintendo and Sega Genesis. You name it and I’ll mostly have it.”

Ziggy’s attracts video game aficionados from every age and all walks of life on a daily basis. He enjoys the younger generation getting their hands on the vintage video games.

 “It’s nice to see the new generation interested in buying video games that I used to enjoy as a kid,” said Ziggy. “I’ve been in this business for a very long time and to see the younger kids get their hands on the original games makes my job worth it.”



— NANCY ANGEL
209 staff reporter

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