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POSTED August 23, 2013 10:17 p.m.

2 FISHERMEN OVERCOME BY ROTTING-FISH GAS IN MAINE: ROCKLAND, Maine (AP) — Decaying herring inside the fish hold of an 89-foot trawler has created enough noxious gas with a rotting-egg smell to sicken two Maine fishermen and leave one of them unconscious.

Firefighters say the unconscious fisherman was flown by helicopter to a hospital on Friday. They say the other is being treated at another hospital.

Poisonous hydrogen sulfide built up in the fish hold after the Starlight trawler offloaded its herring.

The first fisherman was overcome and lost consciousness while climbing down a ladder into the hold. The second became incapacitated while trying to help him. A third crew member realized what was happening and used a breathing apparatus to rescue them.

Firefighters say the rotting-egg smell was strong and their equipment registered dangerous levels.

NBC RE-AIRING MARTIN LUTHER KING JR. INTERVIEW: LOS ANGELES (AP) — NBC News says it will rebroadcast a 1963 "Meet the Press" interview with Martin Luther King Jr. in honor of the March on Washington's 50th anniversary next week.

King appeared on the news program three days before his landmark "I Have a Dream" speech at the Aug. 28, 1963, civil rights march.

"'Meet the Press' Special Edition: Remembering the Dream" will air Sunday on 10 NBC-owned stations and on New England Cable News and a number of NBC affiliates. Most stations will air it immediately before or after the regularly scheduled episode of "Meet the Press" (check local listings).

The half-hour interview with King and NAACP leader Roy Wilkins will air in full, a half-century to the day after its original showing. It will be available online afterward.

SIDES AGREE TO DROP PAULA DEEN DISCRIMINATION SUIT : SAVANNAH, Ga. (AP) — Lawyers signed a deal Friday to drop a discrimination and sexual harassment lawsuit against celebrity cook Paula Deen, who was dumped by the Food Network and other business partners after she said under oath that she had used racial slurs in the past.

A document filed in U.S. District Court in Savannah said both sides agreed to drop the lawsuit "without any award of costs or fees to any party." No other details of the agreement were released. The judge in the case had not signed an order to finalize the dismissal.

Former employee Lisa Jackson last year sued Deen and her brother, Bubba Hiers, saying she suffered from sexual harassment and racially offensive talk and employment practices that were unfair to black workers during her five years as a manager of Uncle Bubba's Seafood and Oyster House. Deen is co-owner of the restaurant, which is primarily run by her brother.

The dismissal deal came less than two weeks after Judge William T. Moore threw out the race discrimination claims, ruling Jackson, who is white, had no standing to sue over what she said was poor treatment of black workers. He let Jackson's claims of sexual harassment stand, but the deal drops those also.

The lawsuit would be dismissed "with prejudice," which means it can't be brought again with the same claims.

POLICE: BOY FATALLY SHOT 90-YEAR-OLD RELATIVE: SLAUGHTER, La. (AP) — Authorities in Louisiana said Friday that an 8-year-old boy intentionally shot and killed a 90-year-old woman who was his caregiver after watching a video game with violent themes.

East Feliciana Parish sheriff's deputies did not provide a motive. But they said the juvenile was playing the video game "Grand Theft Auto IV" — a realistic game that's been associated with encouraging violence and awards points to players for killing people — just minutes before the fatal shooting.

Authorities are calling the shooting a homicide.

The sheriff's office said that although the child told investigators that he accidentally shot the woman while playing with a firearm, evidence has led investigators to believe the child intentionally shot her in the back of the head while she was watching television.

The child was released to his parents Thursday night.

CREWS SEARCH FOR CAUSE OF I-80 SINK HOLE: RENO, Nev. (AP) — A sink hole discovered in the median of Interstate 80 west of Reno forced the temporary closure of two travel lanes in both directions.

The California Department of Transportation says the sink hole is located about a half mile west of Donner Pass Road in Truckee.

All lanes were open Friday afternoon after crews finished filling it.

The cause of the sink hole is still unknown, but Caltrans spokeswoman Rochelle Jenkins says it was probably created by water moving underground near the highway.

The sink hole had encroached upon the fast lanes of both westbound and eastbound traffic, but so far there's no sign of stress or cracking of the highway that is the main route between Northern California and Nevada.

VEGAS CASE SEEN TO SHOW 'SOVEREIGN CITIZEN' THREAT: LAS VEGAS (AP) — A foiled plot by two self-proclaimed adherents of a sovereign citizen movement to kidnap and execute Las Vegas police officers shows the potential for violence from a growing group that renounces government and is considered a domestic terror group at its extremes, experts and investigators said Friday.

Allegations that David Allen Brutsche, 42, and Devon Campbell Newman, 67, planned to confront police officers during traffic stops and kill them if they resisted illustrated the volatility of official interactions with people committed to the idea of fighting governmental authority, they said.

"You look at their motivation being that the government that gives the officer authority isn't viable, and if they get a following, it's a threat to be reckoned with," said Kory Flowers, a Greensboro, N.C., police detective who studies sovereign citizen groups and teaches police about them.

Heidi Beirich, director of the Intelligence Project at the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, Ala., counted seven killings of law enforcement officers by alleged sovereign citizen members in the past 10 years in South Carolina, Louisiana, Arkansas and last year in Alamo, Calif.

Other officers have been served with "paper terrorism" arrest documents and bills for millions of dollars, Beirich said, or discovered liens filed against their personal property.

 

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