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POSTED September 20, 2013 8:42 p.m.

NYC MAN GETS 13 YEARS IN TERROR TRAINING CASE: NEW YORK (AP) — An American citizen was sentenced to 13 years in prison on Friday for lying to the FBI about his attempts to wage violent jihad against U.S. forces by joining the Taliban or al-Qaida.

Prosecutors in federal court in Brooklyn had sought the maximum 21 years behind bars for Abdel Hameed Shehadeh, arguing that he was following a proven formula of other would-be, homegrown terrorists who succeeded in aligning themselves with extremist groups by traveling to Pakistan's tribal areas on the border with Afghanistan.

But U.S. District Judge Eric N. Vitaliano imposed the lesser term after suggesting the defendant proved too immature and inept to pull it off.

FEDS SAY GA. SHERIFF'S DEPUTY SOLD MARIJUANA: ATLANTA (AP) — Federal authorities have filed drug and firearms charges against a Georgia sheriff's deputy they say sold marijuana from his squad car to an undercover law enforcement agent.

The FBI says Newton County sheriff's Deputy Darrell Mathis showed up in his police car, dressed in his sheriff's deputy uniform and wearing his official gun when he sold the agent.

During his initial court appearance Friday, a lawyer was appointed to represent Mathis and he was granted $25,000 bond.

The FBI statement says agents began investigating Mathis in April after two law enforcement officers said a confidential source told them he or she had seen a large amount of marijuana in Mathis' Lithonia apartment during a social visit.

COLORADO RACES TO FIX MOUNTAIN ROADS BEFORE WINTER: BOULDER, Colo. (AP) — With snow already dusting Colorado's highest peaks, the state is racing to replace key mountain highways washed away by flooding, in some cases laying down crude, one-lane gravel roads just to throw a lifeline to isolated towns before winter descends.

More than 200 miles of state highways and at least 50 bridges were damaged or destroyed across this rugged region, plus many more county roads. Fully rebuilding all of them is sure to take years. But for now, the work has to be fast, even if that means cutting corners.

In many other parts of the country, road crews would be able to work through the fall and much of the winter. But in the Rockies, the cold weather comes earlier, stays longer and brings with it countless dangers. The first storms could hit as soon as next month.

That urgency was underlined this week when Trail Ridge Road, the high-elevation path through Rocky Mountain National Park and one of the few supply routes into the town of Estes Park, was temporarily closed because of snow. It normally stays open until October.

 

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