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POSTED November 19, 2013 8:40 p.m.

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NEW ALLEGATION MADE AGAINST ZIMMERMAN IN COURT: SANFORD, Fla. (AP) — George Zimmerman's girlfriend said he tried to choke her about a week ago during an altercation that was not initially reported to police, a prosecutor told a judge Tuesday during Zimmerman's first court appearance on domestic violence-related charges.

Samantha Scheibe feared for her life because Zimmerman mentioned suicide and said he "had nothing to lose," according to Assistant State Attorney Lymary Munoz.

After the hearing, Zimmerman's public defenders said he did not appear to be suicidal and expressed confidence he would be acquitted of any wrongdoing in Monday's domestic dispute.

Hours later, Zimmerman was released from jail after posting $9,000 bond. He was seen walking out of the jail smiling and getting into a car.

Judge Frederic Schott ordered him to stay away from Scheibe's house, wear a monitoring device and refrain from contact with her. He was forbidden from possessing guns or ammunition or travelling outside Florida.

MALFUNCTIONING DRONE LEAVES HOLE IN NAVY SHIP : SAN DIEGO (AP) — A Navy official says a malfunctioning drone left a hole in a Navy guided missile cruiser and caused internal damage after it struck the ship during a weekend exercise off the Southern California coast.

Lt. Rick Chernitzer said officials examined the USS Chancellorsville on Monday, a day after it pulled into San Diego.

The ship was tracking the unmanned aircraft during radar testing Saturday off Point Mugu in Ventura County when it struck the Chancellorsville.

Two sailors were treated for minor burns.

Officials declined to comment further while the cause is being investigated.

The aerial drone was a BQM-74 series, manufactured by Aerospace giant Northrop Grumman Corp. According to the company website, the drones can simulate enemy missiles or airplanes.

WITNESS: TEEN RUNNING WHEN SHOT BY OKLA. OFFICER: OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The friend of a teenager who was fatally shot by an Oklahoma police captain testified Tuesday that the unarmed 18-year-old was running away when the officer began firing at him.

"It surprised me very much," John Lockett, 17, testified on the first day of testimony in the trial of Del City police Capt. Randy Harrison, who is charged with first-degree manslaughter in the March 14, 2012, death of Dane Scott Jr.

Lockett said he was a passenger in a car driven by Scott when Harrison pulled up behind them in a police car with lights flashing. Lockett said Scott led Harrison on a high-speed chase and tried to hide the marijuana and gun he had in the car.

Scott, who had recently been released from a juvenile detention center for selling drugs, "just started to panic," Lockett said.

Lockett said he and a second passenger pleaded with Scott to let them out during the chase that he said reached speeds of up to 100 mph. The car eventually crashed into a tractor-trailer.

Lockett said Scott and Harrison scuffled on the ground after the collision before Scott wriggled free. As soon as Scott started running away, Harrison started shooting at him, Lockett said.

Authorities say Scott fired four shots, with the fourth one fatally striking Lockett in the back.

FARM BILL TAKES AIM AT STATE ANIMAL WELFARE LAWS: WASHINGTON (AP) — The future of state laws that regulate everything from the size of a hen's cage to the safe consumption of Gulf oysters may be at stake as farm bill negotiators work to resolve a long-simmering fight between agriculture and animal welfare interests.

The House Agriculture Committee added language to its version of the farm bill earlier this year that says a state cannot impose certain production standards on agricultural products sold in interstate commerce. The provision, authored by Rep. Steve King, R-Iowa, is aimed at a California law that will require all eggs sold in the state to come from hens that inhabit cages in which they can spread their wings — a major burden for egg producers in Iowa and other states who don't use large cages and still want to sell eggs to the lucrative California market. The law goes into effect in 2015.

"Bottom line of it is no state should be allowed to regulate production in other states," King said at a meeting of House-Senate negotiators last month.

But opponents say that depending on how the language is interpreted, the provision could lead to challenges of dozens of other state laws — including some aimed at food safety, fire safety and basic consumer protections.

TTEEN GETS LIFE FOR KIDNAPPING, KILLING GIRL : GOLDEN, Colo. (AP) — A psychologist described him as sadistic, and prosecutors said he methodically killed and dismembered the 10-year-old girl he grabbed on her way to school.

But lawyers for Austin Sigg said Tuesday the 18-year-old was still a child himself, he might have suffered trauma before and during birth, and he had anxiety, a learning disability and an emotionally distant mother.

Judge Stephen Munsinger rejected that image and the defense argument that Sigg should be eligible for parole in 40 years. He instead ordered the teen to serve a life sentence for killing Jessica Ridgeway plus 86 years for other offenses, including sexually assaulting her and trying to attack a jogger a few months before. The sentence ensured Sigg will never be released.

APOLOGY MADE FOR 'TRAIL OF TEARS' FOOTBALL BANNER: MCALLA, Ala. (AP) — Administrators of an Alabama high school have apologized for a banner displayed during a football game recalling the "Trail of Tears," in which Native Americans were forcibly marched from the Southeast.

McAdory High School played the Pinson Valley Indians on Friday night. McAdory cheerleaders held up a sign saying their opponents should "get ready to leave in a Trail of Tears."

The sign recalled the U.S. government's forced removal of Native Americans from ancestral homes to present-day Oklahoma. Thousands died.

McAdory Principal Tod Humphries says he accepted responsibility for not having banners pre-approved before the game. Humphries has said the person who typically approves signs was on maternity leave.

Humphries says the cheerleaders who made the sign will face disciplinary action.

 

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