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POSTED February 14, 2014 8:30 p.m.

MAMMOTH TUSK LIFTED FROM SEATTLE CONSTRUCTION PIT: SEATTLE (AP) — A fossilized mammoth tusk discovered in a Seattle construction site was retrieved Friday evening from a 30-foot-deep pit to the sound of cheers and clicking from people taking pictures.
Scientists and construction crews used a crane to retrieve and hoist the tusk, which was placed on a pallet, encased in plaster and covered in blankets, to a waiting flat-bed truck. The tusk headed to its new home a few miles away at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture on the University of Washington’s Seattle campus, where it will be preserved, studied and eventually put on display.
The tusk, believed to be of a Columbian mammoth, was measured at 8.5-feet long after it was fully exposed overnight. It’s between 20,000 and 60,000 years old and with the plaster encasing could weigh up to 500 pounds, said Christian Sidor, a paleontologist from the Burke Museum.

NATIVE AMERICAN SITE LEAVES MIAMI IN QUANDARY : MIAMI (AP) — In a vacant lot between gleaming hotels in downtown Miami, are a series of holes carved into the bedrock that form eight circles.
At first glance, the site seems like an eyesore, but it’s here where archaeologists say they have uncovered a major prehistoric Native American village, one of the largest and earliest examples of urban planning ever uncovered in North America.
It’s also where a movie theater, condos and 34-story hotel are expected to be built.
The discovery has pitted developers against archaeologists and historic preservationists. The dispute comes as an increasing number of Native American sites are being uncovered around the country with advances in technology and a greater understanding of the subtle markers left behind to look for.
The discoveries pose difficult questions for cities such as Miami that must decide whether it is best to preserve the remains of an ancient society or, often times, destroy it in hopes of revitalizing a new one.
At its height, archaeologist Bob Carr estimated as many as 2,000 people lived in the Tequesta village, starting around 500 B.C. It likely extended a quarter mile along the Miami River and then wrapped around Biscayne Bay.

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