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Great Wolf resort OK to open — or is it?
totem tpwer
The Totem Tower slide at Great Wolf.

 The new closure orders and those concerns allowed to be open in some manner due to the COVID-19 pandemic issued Monday by the San Joaquin County Health Department are a mixed bag

Protests are legal under the health emergency orders only if they take place outside. The same goes for gyms, fitness centers, worshipping services, offices for non-essential services, personal care services (nail salons, body waxing, and tattoo parlors), hair salons, barbershops and malls.

That means if nail salons, barbershops, hair salons and others businesses listed can figure a way to serve clients outside they can stay open for business.

Other businesses that are open for outside operations only are cardrooms, wineries, and restaurants.

Business that are open in San Joaquin County include tribal casinos (how they differ from card rooms is anyone’s guess), campgrounds, RV parks, outdoor recreation, swimming pools, racetracks without spectators, childcare, day camps, retail, and hotels for tourism and travel.

Businesses still not allowed to open are bars/pubs and brewpubs even if they serve food, family entertainment centers, movie theaters, zoos, and museums.

Business that are open in San Joaquin County include tribal casinos (how they differ from card rooms is anyone’s guess), campgrounds, RV parks, outdoor recreation, swimming pools, racetracks without spectators, childcare, day camps, retail, and hotels for tourism and travel.

That means Great Wolf can still open Sept. 1 as it is cleared as a tourism hotel as a swimming pool.

But under the new orders the eight restaurants that are part of Great Wolf appear to have to offer outside seating, pickup or delivery as things currently stand.

Then there is the issue of the family entertainment center at Great Wolf that includes plenty of contact point activities including a ropes course, arcade games, miniature golf, bowling, and more.

Great Wolf’s 12,000-square-foot conference center clearly isn’t opening any time soon due to state public health directives prohibit professional, social and community gatherings. Gatherings are defined as meetings or other events that bring together persons from multiple households at the same time for a shared or group experience in a single room, space, or place such as an auditorium, stadium, arena, large conference room, meeting hall, or other indoor or outdoor space. They are deemed to pose an especially high danger of transmission and spread of COVID-19.

 

 

Manteca gets it

right for restoring

pavement following

underground work

For the first time in 30 years — if not longer — the City of Manteca has required a contractor tearing up a major arterial to do pipeline work to resurface the street that they tore up with a new overlay.

The work was on the westbound lanes of Atherton Drive from Woodward Avenue to Van Ryn Avenue and then on Van Ryn Avenue to then on Van Ryn from Atherton Drive to the municipal water well just south of the 120 Bypass by the Paseo Villas Apartments.

And unlike other contractors that tore up city sidewalks to install fiber optics and then filled in the hole using asphalt with craftsmanship that was a borderline “F”, the city project replaced a torn segment of sidewalk by the water well with cement weeks after it was torn up.’

The resurfacing was completed Saturday.

Usually crews only asphalt the area that was cut out. It not only looks ugly but it never restores the pavement to an even surface.

By having a more thorough street surface restoration as part of a water line that goes to bid or being made a requirement of a developer not only does it reduce street deterioration but it also reduces impacts on the general fund that is overburdened with a long list of needed street work.

This way growth or water users pay for the work and fix issues they create.

Some may view

illegal fireworks

enforcement this

years as a big dud

 

It is a question several people are asking: How did the City of Manteca only manage to issue 9 citations for illegal fireworks this year while the City of Lathrop issued 19 working with the Lathrop Manteca Fire District?

The answer: Police and fire crews were swamped with emergency and service calls on the Fourth of July limiting the ability for teams to search out illegal fireworks.

Fire Battalion Chief Dave Marques confirmed that was the case Monday.

Some had hopes the city — based on the barrage of illegal fireworks — could easily exceed the 25 citations issued in 2019 to send out a $1,000 message that would help to further reduce illegal fireworks next year.

The $1,000 represents a $750 fine and $250 in administrative fees.

There is little doubt those who are not happy with the increase in illegal fireworks view a 64 percent drop in citations with such a surge in illegal activity will see the City of Manteca’s efforts this year as a dud.

 

To contact Dennis Wyatt, email dwyatt@mantecabulletin.com